Category Archives: News & Exhibitions

La Storia

bouquet-installation-2

LA STORIA, exhibition view

 

Thrilled to show with Michelle and Laurie in Jersey City – La Storia – listed as one of AFC’s must see events

Elsa Morante’s seminal novel of Italian women and children’s experience and struggles during the Second World War, La Storia, provides both the theme and the title of the exhibition.   Like Morante, each of the artists in the exhibition is concerned with the “dailyness” of living and the ways in which seeming banal experiences come together over time to create meaning and even define a life. In all of the works selected, the artists’ reveal their interested in the ways pattern and repetition accumulate to create broader, more profound meaning.  Each too is concerned with the variety of women’s experience, choosing subjects or materials that are frequently casually and patronizingly defined as women’s interest. Continue reading

In “The Finch”

Mazza_OpenLetter_040x

I like a painting that does something, like a machine does something: you turn it on and it functions —

The click of the shutter, the click of the cliché, but lets come back to that later…

I have noticed that not infrequently, when I find myself in front of a painting I have been introduced to through an invitation or an article online; that the painting in question does not give back anything more in person than the digital image I’d previously seen. It yields nothing new, no new read, no additional meaning. On occasion it may yield something less than its copy: almost seeming to function purely as a painted iteration of the digital image. The digital privileges the retinal.  read the rest of the article here —

Painting = Machine

Blow-Up_(no._1)_2013_oil_on_canvas_36_x_47_inches

I think all of the ways of being affected by an artwork are valid and interesting, but my question centered around what it was I wanted my own work to do. I feel it likely that I stick to painting because I enjoy the physicality of it, the goo aspect. The way the goo makes the image come over on you, not just retinally, but with the complicity of the eye it works directly on the body to engage many more senses than the one. I decided that in fact, it did not matter to me so much what a painting looked like, but what it did.  read more…

 

At the Watson Library

Chevreul_La-loi-1024x424

M. E. Chevreul, plates 5-7 from De la loi du contraste simultané des couleurs … [The Law of Simultaneous Contrast of Colors] (Paris: Chez Pitois-Levrault, 1839). Watson Library Special Collections.

From The Library as Incubator Project:

Jared Ash at the Special Collections of the Watson Library:

“I had a strong feeling that Watson had a wealth of titles that Jen would find interesting, inspiring, and informative, and encouraged her to come up for a visit. I am thrilled that my hunch was correct, and that material that Jen found at Watson was in fact helpful in creating her new book, 10 White Lies & Poem of the End (New York: Jen Mazza, 2015).”  read on —